Archive for the ‘Tomato Paste’ Category

Chick Pea Pastini

August 10, 2017

Advertisements

Quick Haddock With Tomato And Puy Lentils (Mary Berry)

January 31, 2017

quick-haddock-with-tomato-and-puy-lentils-mary-berry

Herb and Cranberry Sausage Loaf

November 30, 2016

herb-and-cranberry-sausage-loaf-1 herb-and-cranberry-sausage-loaf-2

Provençale Tomato Sauce (Julia Child)

July 28, 2016

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • cup finely minced yellow onions
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • 4 teaspoons all-purpose flour
  • 5 to 6 pounds ripe tomatoes, quartered
  • teaspoon sugar, plus more to taste
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced or put through a press
  • A large herb bouquet: 8 sprigs parsley, 1 bay leaf and 4 sprigs thyme, all tied in cheesecloth
  • ¼ teaspoon fennel seeds
  • ½ teaspoon dried basil, oregano, marjoram or savory
  • Large pinch saffron threads
  • 1 dozen coriander seeds, lightly crushed
  • 1 2-inch piece dried orange peel (or 1/2 teaspoon granules)
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons tomato paste (optional)

Preparation

  1. In a large heavy pot, heat the oil over medium-low heat. Add the onions, sprinkle with salt and cook slowly for about 10 minutes, until tender but not browned. Sprinkle on the flour and cook slowly for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally; do not brown.
  2. Meanwhile, fit a food processor with the coarse grating blade. Working in batches to avoid overfilling the machine, push the tomatoes through the feed tube to make a coarse purée.
  3. Stir the tomatoes, sugar, garlic, herb bouquet, fennel, basil, saffron, coriander, orange peel and 1 teaspoon salt into the pot. Cover and cook slowly for 10 minutes, so the tomatoes will render more of their juice. Then uncover and simmer for about an hour, until thick. The sauce is done when it tastes thoroughly cooked and is thick enough to form a mass in the spoon. Remove herb bouquet and taste. Season with salt, pepper, sugar and tomato paste, and simmer two minutes more. The sauce may be used immediately, refrigerated or frozen for up to 6 months.

Penne Arrabbiata with Cherry Tomatoes

July 20, 2016

Penne Arrabbiata with Cherry Tomatoes Penne Arrabbiata with Cherry Tomatoes 2

Easy Oven Roasted Sausage Ratatouille

June 14, 2016

Easy Oven Roasted Sausage Ratatouille 1 Easy Oven Roasted Sausage Ratatouille 2

Beef and Beer Stew (Dorie Greenspan)

February 24, 2016

1/4 cup flour

Fine sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

21/2 pounds chuck or other stew beef, cut into 2-inch cubes, patted dry

3 tablespoons flavorless oil, such as canola, or more as needed

6 slices thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

4 medium yellow onions, thinly sliced

4 cloves garlic (green germ removed), finely chopped

One 12-ounce bottle Belgian, abbey or brown ale or beer, such as Chimay

11/2 cups no-salt-added beef broth

21/2 tablespoons brown sugar (light or dark)

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard

1 tablespoon tomato paste or concentrate

1/2 teaspoon ground allspice

Pinch ground cloves

4 sprigs thyme

3 bay leaves

2 cups cubed, roasted vegetables, or as much as you like (optional)

1/4 cup chopped parsley, dill, chives, tarragon or mixed herbs, for serving
Steps

Put the flour in a mixing bowl, season generously with salt and pepper and drop in the beef; toss to coat.

Pour 2 tablespoons of the oil into a 4-to-5-quart Dutch oven set over medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, add as many beef cubes as you can without crowding them, first shaking off excess flour. The beef will steam, not brown, if the pan is too full; cook, seasoning each batch with salt and pepper, until browned on all sides. The pieces should release easily from the bottom of the pot. As the meat is browned, transfer it to a separate bowl. If you need more oil to finish browning the batches, add it as needed. Reserve any leftover flour. If the oil in the pot has burned, wipe out the pot, leaving whatever solids (browned bits) have stuck to the bottom of the pot.

Toss the bacon into the pot and cook, stirring, until it has browned and its fat has rendered; transfer to the bowl with the beef.

Add the butter to the pot along with the onions and garlic. Season lightly with salt and pepper; reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are caramel-colored. Be patient; this can take at least 30 minutes. If you had leftover flour, stir it into the caramelized onions and cook for 2 minutes, until it browns and loses its raw-flour taste.

While the onions are caramelizing, preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Spoon the meat, bacon and whatever juices may have accumulated in the bowl back into the Dutch oven. Add the ale or beer, the broth, brown sugar, vinegar, mustard, tomato paste, allspice, cloves, thyme and bay leaves; increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Taste for salt and pepper, adding more as needed. Cover the pot tightly with aluminum foil, then with its lid, and slide it into the oven. Cook (middle rack) for 21/2 to 3 hours or until the meat is tender enough to cut with a spoon. Discard the thyme sprigs and bay leaves.

When you’re ready to serve, stir in the roasted vegetables, if using, then sprinkle the stew with the chopped herbs.

The Perfect Cassoulet (Felicity Cloake)

March 20, 2014

The perfect cassoulet

(Serves 6-8)

800g haricot beans, soaked in cold water overnight
1 onion, peeled
1 head of garlic, unpeeled, plus 4 cloves
2 sprigs of thyme
1 bay leaf
1 small, unsmoked ham hock, skin on
2 confit duck legs and their fat
500g pork belly or lamb breast, cubed
4 garlicky Toulouse sausages
1 tbsp sun-dried tomato paste
120g breadcrumbs
2 tbps walnut oil

Drain the beans well and put them in a large, ovenproof casserole dish. Pour in water until it comes about 3cm above the top of the beans, then add the onion, whole head of garlic, herbs and ham hock. Bring to the boil, then cover and simmer for about two hours, until just tender, but not falling apart.

Meanwhile, fry the duck, pork belly or lamb breast, and sausages separately in plenty of duck fat until crisp and golden. When cool, cut the sausages into large chunks and strip the meat from the duck in large pieces.

Remove the onion and herbs from the beans and discard. Remove the ham hock and, when cool enough, strip the meat from it. Squeeze the garlic cloves from their skins and mash to a paste with four tablespoons of duck fat and the fresh garlic cloves. Stir in the sun-dried tomato paste. Preheat the oven to 140C/275F/gas mark one.

Drain the beans, reserving the liquid. Grease the bottom of the casserole with a little of the duck fat mix, then tip in the beans, the rest of the duck fat and the pieces of meat, keeping back half the sausage. Mix well, then top with just enough liquid to cover – you probably won’t need to add any seasoning, as both the ham and the confit will be quite salty.

Fry the breadcrumbs very briefly in one tablespoon of duck fat, then top the cassoulet with a thin layer of them. Bake for about two hours, keeping an eye on it – once a crust has formed, stir this back into the cassoulet, and top with some more of the breadcrumbs. By the end of the cooking time, you should have a thick, golden crust.

Drizzle with a little walnut oil, and leave to cool slightly before serving with a sharply dressed green salad.

Slow-cooked chickpeas on toast with poached egg (Yotam Ottolenghi)

October 23, 2013

“I tested this dish on a group of card-carrying sceptics: “Five hours to cook beans on toast?” How could I possibly justify the time involved when the more famous variation on this theme can be on the table inside a couple of minutes? Each to their own, I say. These chickpeas are impossibly soft and yielding, and the flavour is rich and deep in a way that only slow cooking can bring about. (Please don’t be tempted to omit the salt: it keeps the skins intact and prevents the chickpeas from disintegrating.)

Notwithstanding the cooking time, this is really very low-maintenance comfort food. The chickpeas taste fantastic the next day, too, not to mention the day after that, so you might want to double the quantities and keep a batch in the fridge. I like it topped with a spoonful of Greek yogurt.”

Serves four.

220g medium-sized dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in lots of cold water with ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tbsp olive oil, plus 1 tbsp to serve
1 medium onion, peeled and roughly chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1½ tsp tomato paste
¼ tsp cayenne pepper
¼ tsp smoked paprika
2 small red peppers, roughly chopped into 0.5cm dice
Salt and black pepper
1 beef tomato, peeled and roughly chopped
½ tsp caster sugar

To serve
4 slices sourdough, brushed with olive oil and grilled on both sides
4 eggs, poached
1 tsp za’atar

Strain and rinse the chickpeas. Put a large saucepan on a high heat, add the chickpeas and cover with plenty of cold water. Bring to a boil, skim the surface, boil for five minutes, strain and set the chickpeas aside.

Put the oil, onion, garlic, tomato paste, cayenne, paprika and red peppers in a food processor, along with a teaspoon of salt and some black pepper, and blitz to a paste.

Wipe down the chickpea saucepan, return it to the stove on medium heat and add the paste. Fry for five minutes (there’s enough oil in the paste to allow for this), stirring occasionally, then add the tomato, sugar, chickpeas and 200ml water. Bring to a low simmer, cover and cook on a very low heat for four hours, stirring from time to time and adding water as needed to maintain a sauce-like consistency. Remove the lid and cook for a final hour: the sauce needs to thicken without the chickpeas becoming dry.

Put a slice of grilled sourdough on each plate, spoon over some chickpeas and top with a poached egg. Sprinkle over some za’atar and a dribble of oil, and serve hot.

World’s Best Lasagna (John Chandler) Allrecipes.com

September 20, 2013

Original recipe makes 12 servings

1 pound sweet Italian sausage

3/4 pound lean ground beef

1/2 cup minced onion

2 cloves garlic, crushed

1 (28 ounce) can crushed tomatoes

2 (6 ounce) cans tomato paste

2 (6.5 ounce) cans canned tomato sauce

1/2 cup water

2 tablespoons white sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons dried basil leaves

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

1 tablespoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

12 lasagna noodles

16 ounces ricotta cheese

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon salt

3/4 pound mozzarella cheese, sliced

3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

In a Dutch oven, cook sausage, ground beef, onion, and garlic over medium heat until well browned. Stir in crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, tomato sauce, and water. Season with sugar, basil, fennel seeds, Italian seasoning, 1 tablespoon salt, pepper, and 2 tablespoons parsley. Simmer, covered, for about 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally.

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Cook lasagna noodles in boiling water for 8 to 10 minutes. Drain noodles, and rinse with cold water.

In a mixing bowl, combine ricotta cheese with egg, remaining parsley, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

To assemble, spread 1 1/2 cups of meat sauce in the bottom of a 9×13 inch baking dish. Arrange 6 noodles lengthwise over meat sauce. Spread with one half of the ricotta cheese mixture. Top with a third of mozzarella cheese slices. Spoon 1 1/2 cups meat sauce over mozzarella, and sprinkle with 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese. Repeat layers, and top with remaining mozzarella and Parmesan cheese. Cover with foil: to prevent sticking, either spray foil with cooking spray, or make sure the foil does not touch the cheese.

Bake in preheated oven for 25 minutes. Remove foil, and bake an additional 25 minutes. Cool for 15 minutes before serving.