Archive for the ‘Coriander’ Category

Base Curry Sauce (Dan Toombs)

May 23, 2017

Lamb Madras (Dan Toombs)

May 23, 2017

Lamb Biryani (Dan Toombs)

May 23, 2017

Chicken Tikka Masala (Dan Toombs)

May 23, 2017

Spicy Chilli with Green Beans (Tom Kerridge)

March 7, 2017

Chicken And Pepper Jollof Rice

January 31, 2017

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Lamb Tagine (Mary Berry)

September 20, 2016

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Provençale Tomato Sauce (Julia Child)

July 28, 2016

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • cup finely minced yellow onions
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • 4 teaspoons all-purpose flour
  • 5 to 6 pounds ripe tomatoes, quartered
  • teaspoon sugar, plus more to taste
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced or put through a press
  • A large herb bouquet: 8 sprigs parsley, 1 bay leaf and 4 sprigs thyme, all tied in cheesecloth
  • ¼ teaspoon fennel seeds
  • ½ teaspoon dried basil, oregano, marjoram or savory
  • Large pinch saffron threads
  • 1 dozen coriander seeds, lightly crushed
  • 1 2-inch piece dried orange peel (or 1/2 teaspoon granules)
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons tomato paste (optional)

Preparation

  1. In a large heavy pot, heat the oil over medium-low heat. Add the onions, sprinkle with salt and cook slowly for about 10 minutes, until tender but not browned. Sprinkle on the flour and cook slowly for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally; do not brown.
  2. Meanwhile, fit a food processor with the coarse grating blade. Working in batches to avoid overfilling the machine, push the tomatoes through the feed tube to make a coarse purée.
  3. Stir the tomatoes, sugar, garlic, herb bouquet, fennel, basil, saffron, coriander, orange peel and 1 teaspoon salt into the pot. Cover and cook slowly for 10 minutes, so the tomatoes will render more of their juice. Then uncover and simmer for about an hour, until thick. The sauce is done when it tastes thoroughly cooked and is thick enough to form a mass in the spoon. Remove herb bouquet and taste. Season with salt, pepper, sugar and tomato paste, and simmer two minutes more. The sauce may be used immediately, refrigerated or frozen for up to 6 months.

Chicken Tikka Masala (Madhur Jaffrey)

November 14, 2015

Probably created in Britain, chicken tikka masala – or CTM as it is often called – is easily the most popular Indian curry in the UK today. And yet nobody is quite clear about its origins. It is possible that a chef in Birmingham, with too many tandoor-roasted chicken pieces (“tikkas”) left over, decided to reheat them in a quick stir-fried curry sauce. However it originated, it is here to stay.

The tikkas need to marinate for six to eight hours. Serve with Indian breads or rice. I prefer chicken thighs but you may use breasts if you wish.

Serves 4–6
For the chicken tikka
boneless, skinless chicken thighs or breasts 675g, cut into 2½cm chunks
salt 1¼ tsp
lemon juice 3 tbsp
root ginger 1 tbsp, peeled, finely grated
garlic cloves 2, finely grated or crushed
ground cumin 1 tsp
paprika 1 tsp
chilli powder ½–¾ tsp
whipping cream 6 tbsp
garam masala ½ tsp
olive or sunflower oil 3 tbsp

For the masala
olive or sunflower oil 4 tbsp
onions 140g, halved and finely sliced
root ginger 1 tbsp, peeled, finely grated
garlic cloves 5–6, crushed
ground coriander 1 tbsp
turmeric ½ tsp
chilli powder ¾ tsp
paprika 2 tsp
yogurt 4 tbsp
medium tomatoes 2, peeled and very finely chopped
chicken stock 350ml
salt ¼ tsp, or to taste
garam masala ¼ tsp
corianderleaves 4 tbsp, chopped

Start by marinating the chicken tikka. Put the chicken in a non-reactive bowl and rub in the salt and lemon juice. Prod the chicken pieces lightly with the tip of a knife and rub the seasonings in again, then set aside for 20 minutes. Add the ginger, garlic, cumin, paprika, chilli powder, cream and garam masala. Mix well, cover, and refrigerate for six to eight hours (longer will not hurt).

When you’re ready to cook, make the masala: pour the 4 tablespoons of oil into a large, preferably non-stick, lidded pan and set it over a medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, put in the onions. Stir and fry until they brown, six or seven minutes. Add the ginger and garlic and continue to fry, stirring, for a minute. Add the ground coriander, turmeric, chilli powder and paprika. Stir for 10 seconds, then add a tablespoon of the yogurt. Stir and fry until it is absorbed. Add the remaining yogurt in this way, a tablespoon at a time.

Now put in the tomatoes. Fry them for three or four minutes, or until they turn pulpy. Add the stock and salt, and bring to a simmer. Cover, reduce the heat to low, and simmer gently for 15–20 minutes. The sauce should turn thick. Stir in the garam masala and coriander leaves, taste for seasoning and add more salt if you need it.

Shortly before you eat, preheat the grill to its highest setting. Thread the chicken on to two to four skewers (the flat, sword-like ones are best). Brush with the 3 tablespoons of oil and balance the skewers on the rim of a shallow baking tray, so that the meat is suspended and does not touch the tray. Place about 13 centimetres (5 inches) from the source of heat and grill for six minutes on each side, or until lightly browned, cooked through and charred in places. (Cut a large piece of chicken to the centre to check there is no trace of pink.)

When the tikkas are cooked, reheat the sauce and fold in the chicken.

Serve immediately.
From Madhur Jaffrey’s Curry Nation by Madhur Jaffrey

Squash Pear and Sweet Potato Soup

November 5, 2015

Squash Pear and Sweet Potato Soup