Archive for the ‘Raisins’ Category

Millionaires Fudge (William Curley)

December 16, 2013

Millionaires Fudge (William Curley)

Classic Christmas Fruit Cake (Fiona Cairns)

October 14, 2013

Classic Christmas Fruit Cake (Fiona Cairns)

Classic Christmas Pudding (Fiona Cairns)

October 14, 2013

Classic Christmas Pudding (Fiona Cairns)

Ginger and honey Glazed Ham (Good Housekeeping)

September 30, 2013

Ginger and honey Glazed Ham (Good Housekeeping)

Easiest Ever Christmas Cake, Icing and Decoration (Good Housekeeping)

September 24, 2013

Easiest Ever Christmas Cake, Icing and Decoration 1 (Good Housekeeping) Easiest Ever Christmas Cake, Icing and Decoration 2 (Good Housekeeping)

Fragrant Lamb Tagine with Prunes and Almonds (David Tanis)

February 7, 2013

Although lamb shanks have become chic and expensive, you could easily make this tagine with boneless lamb shoulder cut into chunks to keep the cost low. It’s just as delicious.

Serves 6

2.5kg of lamb shanks, or 1.8kg of boneless lamb shoulder, trimmed of fat
2 tbsp butter
2 medium onions, thickly sliced
Pinch of saffron threads
6 garlic cloves, chopped
A thumb-size piece of ginger, peeled and slivered
1 small cinnamon stick
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tbsp ground ginger
1-2 tsp ground cayenne pepper
150g golden raisins
300g pitted prunes
750ml chicken broth or water
300g chopped tomatoes
Salt and black pepper

For the garnish
1 tbsp butter
200g blanched whole almonds
Large pinch of salt
Small pinch of sugar

1 Preheat the oven to 160C/325F/gas mark 3. Season the lamb generously with salt and pepper, then set aside.

2 Melt the butter in a large frying pan. Add the onions, sprinkle with a little salt and crumble the saffron on top. Sweat the onions gently for about 5 minutes or until slightly softened. Remove from the heat and stir in the garlic, fresh ginger, cinnamon stick, coriander and cumin seeds, powdered ginger and cayenne pepper. Add the raisins and half the prunes.

3 Put the lamb in a deep casserole and spread the onion mixture over the meat. Add the broth or water and tomatoes, and cover the pot with foil and a tight-fitting lid. Bake for about 2 hours or until the meat is tender.

4 Take the dish from the oven and remove the foil and lid. Add the rest of the prunes and submerge them in the liquid. Raise the heat to 200C/400F/gas mark 6 and return the lamb to the oven, uncovered, for about 15 minutes to let the meat brown a bit. Remove the pot from the oven and let it rest for 10 minutes or so.

5 Skim off any fat from the surface of the tagine. Reduce the sauce if it seems thin. The tagine is ready to serve but will reheat perfectly, so you can make it today to serve the next day: the sauce will mature beautifully in the refrigerator overnight.

6 Just before you serve the tagine, heat the butter in a small frying pan over a medium heat and gently fry the almonds, stirring occasionally. When they turn golden, dry them on a paper towel and sprinkle with salt and sugar.

7 To serve, transfer the stew to a large platter and scatter the fried almonds over the lamb.

• From Heart of the Artichoke by David Tanis (Artisan Books).

Classic Christmas Cake (Mary Berry)

January 21, 2013

For the cake
raisins 175g
glacé cherries 350g, halved, rinsed, thoroughly dried and quartered
currants 500g
sultanas 350g
brandy 150ml, plus extra for feeding
zest of 2 oranges finely grated
butter 250g, softened
light muscovado sugar 250g
eggs 4
black treacle 1 tbsp
blanched almonds 75g, chopped
self-raising flour 75g
plain flour 175g
mixed ground spice 1½ tsp

To finish and decorate
apricot jam 3 tbsp, sieved and warmed
icing sugar to dust
almond paste 675g
royal icing 1 recipe quantity, below

For the royal icing to cover a 23cm cake
egg whites 3
icing sugar 675g, sifted
lemon juice 3 tsp
glycerine 1½ tsp

Put all the dried fruit in a container, pour over the brandy and stir in the orange zest. Cover with a lid and leave to soak for three days, stirring daily.

Grease and line a 23cm deep round tin with a double layer of greased greaseproof paper. Preheat the oven to 140C/gas mark 1.

Measure the butter, sugar, eggs, treacle and almonds into a very large bowl and beat well. Add the flours and ground spice and mix thoroughly until blended. Stir in the soaked fruit. Spoon into the prepared cake tin and level the surface.

Bake in the centre of the preheated oven for about 4-4½ hours or until the cake feels firm to the touch and is a rich golden brown. Check after 2 hours, and if the cake is a perfect colour, cover with foil. A skewer inserted into the centre of the cake should come out clean. Leave the cake to cool in the tin.

When cool, pierce the cake at intervals with a fine skewer and feed with a little extra brandy. Wrap the completely cold cake in a double layer of greaseproof paper and again in foil and store in a cool place for up to 3 months, feeding at intervals with more brandy. (Don’t remove the lining paper when storing as this helps to keep the cake moist.)

To decorate: stand the cake upside down, flat side uppermost, on a cake board which is 5cm larger than the size of the cake. Brush the sides and the top of the cake with the warm apricot jam.

Liberally dust a work surface with icing sugar then roll out the almond paste to about 5cm (2in) larger than the surface of the cake. Keep moving the almond paste as you roll, checking that it is not sticking to the work surface. Dust the work surface with more icing sugar as necessary.

Carefully lift the almond paste over the cake using a rolling pin. Gently level and smooth the top of the paste with the rolling pin, then ease the almond paste down the sides of the cake, smoothing it at the same time. If you are careful, you should be able to cover the cake with no excess paste to trim but, if necessary, neatly trim excess from the base of the cake with a small sharp knife. Cover the cake loosely with baking parchment and leave for a few days to dry out before icing.

To make the royal icing: whisk the egg whites in a large bowl until they become frothy. Mix in the sifted icing sugar a tablespoonful at a time. You can do this with a hand-held electric whisk but keep the speed low.

Stir in the lemon juice and glycerine and beat the icing until it is very stiff and white and stands up in peaks.

Cover the surface of the icing tightly with clingfilm and keep in a cool place until needed.

To ice the cake: spread the royal icing evenly over the top and sides of the cake with a palette knife. For a snow-peak effect, use a smaller palette knife to rough up the icing.

Leave the cake loosely covered overnight for the icing to harden a little, then wrap or store in an airtight container in a cool place until needed.

Tips
Instead of covering with almond paste and royal icing, you could simply brush sieved, warmed apricot jam over the top of the cake, and then arrange glacé fruits and nuts over the jam. Brush again with jam.

Preparing ahead
Prepare the fruit and soak in sherry three days ahead. Make the cake and wrap or store in an airtight container. Store in a cool place for up to three months. You could also freeze the cake before decorating, for up to three months; defrost at room temperature.

Ricotta Cheesecake with Marsala Soaked Raisins (Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall)

June 29, 2012

Serves six.

100g raisins
4 tbsp marsala
Butter, for greasing
3 tbsp plain flour, plus extra for dusting
250g ricotta
2 tbsp creme fraiche
2 large eggs, separated
125g caster sugar
Nutmeg
Grated zest of 1 lemon

Soak the raisins in the marsala for a few hours (overnight, if at all possible) until plump. Heat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Butter a 25cm loose-based tart tin, dust the inside with flour and shake out the excess.

Beat the ricotta until smooth, then beat in the creme fraiche. Beat in the egg yolks. Combine the flour and 75g of the sugar, and beat into the mix along with a good grating of nutmeg and the lemon zest. Use a whisk to get rid of any lumps. Finally, stir in the raisins, along with any marsala left in the bowl.

Beat the egg whites until they hold soft peaks. Keep beating, gradually adding the remaining sugar, until you have a thick, glossy meringue that stays in the bowl if you hold it upside down. Stir a heaped tablespoonful of the meringue into the cheese mixture to loosen it, then lightly fold in the rest, keeping as much air in the mix as you can. Pour into the prepared tin and give it a gentle shake to level the surface. Bake for about 35 minutes, or until golden and set. Leave to cool to room temperature (it will sink, but don’t worry). Remove the sides of the tin and serve in generous slices, perhaps with a little glass of marsala to sip alongside.

 

Spiced Christmas Cake (Nigel Slater)

May 4, 2012

Special mincemeat (Mary Berry)

May 4, 2012