Archive for the ‘Onion’ Category

Noodle soup with lentils and soured cream (Nigel Slater)

September 17, 2018
Noodle soup with lentils and soured cream

Serves 4-6
onions 4
olive oil 3 tbsp
garlic 3 cloves
ground turmeric 2 tsp
chickpeas 1 x 400g tin
haricot beans 1 x 400g tin
small brown lentils 100g
vegetable stock 1 litre
butter 40g
linguine or Iranian reshteh noodles 100g
spinach 200g
parsley 30g
coriander 20g
mint 15g
soured cream 250ml

Peel the onions. Roughly chop two of them and thinly slice the others. Warm the olive oil in a large pan set over a moderate heat, add the two chopped onions and fry them for 10-15 minutes till soft and pale gold. Peel and thinly slice the garlic. Stir in the garlic and ground turmeric and continue cooking for a couple of minutes.

Drain the chickpeas and haricot beans and stir them into the onions together with the lentils and stock. Bring to the boil, then lower the heat and leave to simmer for 30 minutes, stirring the pan occasionally.

Melt the butter in a shallow pan, then add the reserved sliced onions and let them cook slowly, with the occasional stir, until they are a rich toffee brown. This will take a good half an hour.

Add the linguine or noodles to the simmering beans. Wash the spinach, put it in a separate pan set over a medium heat, cover with a lid and leave it for 3 or 4 minutes until it has wilted. Turn occasionally with kitchen tongs. Remove the spinach and put it in a colander under cold running water until cool.

Wring the moisture from the spinach with your hands then stir into the simmering stew. Roughly chop the parsley, coriander and mint leaves and stir most of them into the onions and beans.

Fold in the soured cream, then ladle into bowls and fold in the remaining herbs and the fried onions.

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Fergus Henderson’s beef mince on dripping toast

July 18, 2018
Beef mince on dripping toast.

Firstly, save your dripping! Dripping toast is one of those treats for the day after, a lovely second wind from the previous day’s roast. Mince is a dish discussed as much in Scotland (and indeed in London) as cassoulet is in Castelnaudary. Questions such as should you add peas or carrots can start a gastronomic row of great proportions. I do like a spot of carrot in mine.

Total cost: £9.70

Serves 4
onion 1, peeled and thinly sliced
leek 1, cleaned, sliced lengthways in half, then thinly sliced across
carrot 1, peeled, sliced lengthways in half, then thinly sliced across
garlic 2 cloves, peeled and chopped
extra virgin olive oil a splash
minced beef 750g
whole tinned tomatoes 2
oatmeal a handful
Worcestershire sauce 3 tbsp
chicken stock 250ml

For the dripping toast
good white bread 4 slices
dripping to spread generously

In a large pan, sweat the onion, leek, carrot and garlic in the splash of olive oil until softened. Add the mince, giving it a healthy stir to break up. Add the tinned tomatoes, crushed in your hand – a subliminal gesture. Keep stirring and add the oatmeal, not so much that you end up with porridge.

Stir, add the Worcestershire sauce and – if you have a bottle open – a glug of red wine. As this may take it above the £10 mark, it is delicious but not essential. Pour in three-quarters of the chicken stock and stir again.

Take a view on the liquid content; if it seems a wee bit dry, add the rest of the stock. You are looking for a loose lava consistency. Check for seasoning.

Now allow the mince to simmer gently for 1 and a half hours, if not 2 (if it is drying out, add more stock). Time allows the mince to become itself, as is the case for most of us.

Toast the bread, spread the dripping onto each slice and put under the grill for a moment to make sure it melts completely. Spoon the mince over the toast.

Marsala Potato Cakes (Waitrose)

October 3, 2017

Kedgeree (Kate Young)

September 29, 2017

Ingredients
500ml water
1 onion – roughly chopped
1 small carrot – roughly chopped
1 stalk celery – roughly chopped
1 bay leaf
5 black peppercorns
300g smoked haddock (undyed)
2tbsp butter
3 small brown onions

2 cloves garlic
1tsp turmeric
1tsp ground cumin
1tsp ground coriander
1tsp fennel seeds
3 crushed cardamom pods
180ml double cream
250g basmati rice
Parsley
5 eggs
Mango chutney

1 Put the chopped vegetables, peppercorns and the bay leaf in the wide-bottomed pan with the haddock. Cover with the water and bring to the boil on the stove. As soon as it comes to the boil, turn the heat off and set it aside it to cool – the fish will finish cooking as it does so.

Pour the rice into the medium saucepan. Rinse and drain the rice three times in cold water. Add fresh water to the pan until it sits one knuckle higher than the top of the rice. Cover, bring it to the boil, then turn down to a low simmer and cook until the water is at the level of the rice. This should take around 8-10 minutes. Turn the heat off and leave the lid on tightly, covering the pan with a tea towel if it isn’t a snug fit. Leave to steam in the pan for fifteen minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork.

3 Chop the onions into fine slices and mince the garlic. Heat the butter until foaming in the frying pan and add the onions and garlic. Fry until soft and translucent. Add the spices and fry for another two minutes. Add 300ml of the fish cooking water and reduce the liquid by half. Finally, add the cream and reduce until thick.

4 Meanwhile, put the eggs in cold water and boil them to your taste – for this recipe, I like them cooked for five minutes after the water comes to the boil. Run them under cold water and peel them.

Tip the rice into the sauce and stir through so that each grain is coated. Flake the fish in and stir this through too. Serve immediately with mango chutney, parsley and a peeled, sliced egg on each plate.

Harissa Chicken Traybake (Jamie Oliver)

September 19, 2017

Beer Battered Bloomin Onions

September 19, 2017

Swedish Meatballs with Dill Mash (Rosemary Schrager)

September 19, 2017

Steak Tacos with Chipotle Pepper sauce

August 11, 2017

Smoky Seafood Paella

August 11, 2017

Mushroom Burgers with Beetroot Slaw

August 10, 2017