Archive for the ‘Garlic’ Category

Pesto (Felicity Cloake)

July 23, 2018

Prep 20-25 min
Makes 1 small jar

2 tbsp pine nuts
1 pinch salt
250g fresh basil leaves
1 garlic clove (optional)
25g parmesan
25g pecorino
300ml extra-virgin olive oil

1 Toast the nuts

Heat a frying pan on a medium flame, then toast the pine nuts, shaking the pan occasionally, until fragrant and starting to colour. Pine nuts, especially the fat Italian kind, aren’t cheap, so many commercial pestos use cashews; pistachios or almonds also make decent substitutes. (Always taste pine nuts before use: they go rancid very quickly.) Tip out on to a plate and leave to cool completely.

2 Grate the cheese

Meanwhile, get everything else ready. Finely grate the cheese: parmesan and pecorino (I like a combination of the two: the former for its richness; the latter for its cleaner, saltier flavour) are the traditional choices in pesto’s Ligurian homeland, but many commercial pestos use cheaper grana padano; indeed, pretty much any very hard cheese will work.

3 Prep the basil

Pick the basil leaves until you have 250g: discard the stalks, because they discolour quickly and give an unpleasantly fibrous texture to the pesto. (This may seem extravagant, but pasta and pesto is still a pretty cheap meal, especially if you buy the basil in large bunches at a market or greengrocers, where it tends to be cheaper than the supermarket.)

4 Mortar v food processor

Choose your equipment: purists insist that pesto can be made only with a pestle and mortar, because the action is less violent than a food processor. There’s a surprising logic behind this – experiments show that more coarsely chopped basil retains more flavour – but you can still make great pesto in a machine, so long as you use it with care.

5 Start pounding (garlic optional)

Lightly crush the nuts with a pinch of salt, then gradually add the basil, pounding or pulsing just until you have a thick paste. Work as quickly as possible, so the basil retains its vibrant green colour, but be careful not to overwork it, especially if you’re using a food processor. You can also add a garlic clove, although I don’t.

6 Add the cheese and oil

Stir in the cheese, then gradually beat in the oil, keeping a little back for the top of the jar. Extra-virgin olive oil is the usual choice, but you need to exercise caution: some are so strongly peppery that they will overpower the basil, so taste before use. To keep costs down, mix with a neutral oil, as commercial manufacturers often do.

7 Leftovers

Pesto is best eaten fresh, but if you have any left over, spoon into a sterilised jar, then cover with olive oil to form a seal. It should keep for a couple of weeks in the fridge, though always taste a little before adding it to anything. Alternatively, it freezes surprisingly well: ice-cube trays are a good receptacle for individual portions.

8 Traditional extras

To make classic Genovese pesto pasta, seek out trofie: these little twisted pasta pieces hold the sauce perfectly, but strozzapreti, linguine or any long pasta will also do. Boil in well-salted water and toss with the pesto, a handful of blanched green beans and some boiled, peeled and cubed waxy potatoes – a dash of pasta cooking water helps emulsify the sauce.

9 Variations

The word “pesto” comes from “pestare”, meaning to pound or crush, but what you choose to crush is up to you. Pesto alla Siciliana, or pesto rosso, is made with tomatoes, almonds and occasionally mint instead of basil; pesto alla Calabrese uses tomatoes, roast red peppers and ricotta. I often make a British version with wild garlic or parsley, walnuts and goat’s cheese.

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Fergus Henderson’s beef mince on dripping toast

July 18, 2018
Beef mince on dripping toast.

Firstly, save your dripping! Dripping toast is one of those treats for the day after, a lovely second wind from the previous day’s roast. Mince is a dish discussed as much in Scotland (and indeed in London) as cassoulet is in Castelnaudary. Questions such as should you add peas or carrots can start a gastronomic row of great proportions. I do like a spot of carrot in mine.

Total cost: £9.70

Serves 4
onion 1, peeled and thinly sliced
leek 1, cleaned, sliced lengthways in half, then thinly sliced across
carrot 1, peeled, sliced lengthways in half, then thinly sliced across
garlic 2 cloves, peeled and chopped
extra virgin olive oil a splash
minced beef 750g
whole tinned tomatoes 2
oatmeal a handful
Worcestershire sauce 3 tbsp
chicken stock 250ml

For the dripping toast
good white bread 4 slices
dripping to spread generously

In a large pan, sweat the onion, leek, carrot and garlic in the splash of olive oil until softened. Add the mince, giving it a healthy stir to break up. Add the tinned tomatoes, crushed in your hand – a subliminal gesture. Keep stirring and add the oatmeal, not so much that you end up with porridge.

Stir, add the Worcestershire sauce and – if you have a bottle open – a glug of red wine. As this may take it above the £10 mark, it is delicious but not essential. Pour in three-quarters of the chicken stock and stir again.

Take a view on the liquid content; if it seems a wee bit dry, add the rest of the stock. You are looking for a loose lava consistency. Check for seasoning.

Now allow the mince to simmer gently for 1 and a half hours, if not 2 (if it is drying out, add more stock). Time allows the mince to become itself, as is the case for most of us.

Toast the bread, spread the dripping onto each slice and put under the grill for a moment to make sure it melts completely. Spoon the mince over the toast.

Best Roast Potatoes (Jamie Oliver)

December 1, 2017

Perfect Penne All’arrabbiata (Felicity Cloake)

October 9, 2017

Serves 2
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus a little extra to finish
1 tsp chilli flakes
2 garlic cloves, finely sliced
400g good tinned chopped tomatoes
200g penne
1/4 tsp red wine vinegar
Handful of basil leaves

Heat the oil in a frying pan over a medium heat and add the chilli. When it begins to darken, stir in the garlic and cook just until it colours slightly, then add the tomatoes and a generous pinch of salt, breaking up the tomatoes with a spoon.

Simmer for about 15 minutes while you cook the pasta in plenty of boiling salted water until just al dente. The sauce should be thick by this time – if it looks too dry, add a splash of the pasta cooking water.

Stir in the vinegar and season to taste, then drain the pasta and stir into the sauce. Cook until the sauce coats each piece, then divide between bowls, drizzle over a little oil and tear over the basil leaves.

Marsala Potato Cakes (Waitrose)

October 3, 2017

Kedgeree (Kate Young)

September 29, 2017

Ingredients
500ml water
1 onion – roughly chopped
1 small carrot – roughly chopped
1 stalk celery – roughly chopped
1 bay leaf
5 black peppercorns
300g smoked haddock (undyed)
2tbsp butter
3 small brown onions

2 cloves garlic
1tsp turmeric
1tsp ground cumin
1tsp ground coriander
1tsp fennel seeds
3 crushed cardamom pods
180ml double cream
250g basmati rice
Parsley
5 eggs
Mango chutney

1 Put the chopped vegetables, peppercorns and the bay leaf in the wide-bottomed pan with the haddock. Cover with the water and bring to the boil on the stove. As soon as it comes to the boil, turn the heat off and set it aside it to cool – the fish will finish cooking as it does so.

Pour the rice into the medium saucepan. Rinse and drain the rice three times in cold water. Add fresh water to the pan until it sits one knuckle higher than the top of the rice. Cover, bring it to the boil, then turn down to a low simmer and cook until the water is at the level of the rice. This should take around 8-10 minutes. Turn the heat off and leave the lid on tightly, covering the pan with a tea towel if it isn’t a snug fit. Leave to steam in the pan for fifteen minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork.

3 Chop the onions into fine slices and mince the garlic. Heat the butter until foaming in the frying pan and add the onions and garlic. Fry until soft and translucent. Add the spices and fry for another two minutes. Add 300ml of the fish cooking water and reduce the liquid by half. Finally, add the cream and reduce until thick.

4 Meanwhile, put the eggs in cold water and boil them to your taste – for this recipe, I like them cooked for five minutes after the water comes to the boil. Run them under cold water and peel them.

Tip the rice into the sauce and stir through so that each grain is coated. Flake the fish in and stir this through too. Serve immediately with mango chutney, parsley and a peeled, sliced egg on each plate.

Beer Battered Bloomin Onions

September 19, 2017

Red Prawn Curry (Rosemary Schrager)

September 19, 2017

Steak Tacos with Chipotle Pepper sauce

August 11, 2017

Smoky Seafood Paella

August 11, 2017