Archive for the ‘Chickpea’ Category

Noodle soup with lentils and soured cream (Nigel Slater)

September 17, 2018
Noodle soup with lentils and soured cream

Serves 4-6
onions 4
olive oil 3 tbsp
garlic 3 cloves
ground turmeric 2 tsp
chickpeas 1 x 400g tin
haricot beans 1 x 400g tin
small brown lentils 100g
vegetable stock 1 litre
butter 40g
linguine or Iranian reshteh noodles 100g
spinach 200g
parsley 30g
coriander 20g
mint 15g
soured cream 250ml

Peel the onions. Roughly chop two of them and thinly slice the others. Warm the olive oil in a large pan set over a moderate heat, add the two chopped onions and fry them for 10-15 minutes till soft and pale gold. Peel and thinly slice the garlic. Stir in the garlic and ground turmeric and continue cooking for a couple of minutes.

Drain the chickpeas and haricot beans and stir them into the onions together with the lentils and stock. Bring to the boil, then lower the heat and leave to simmer for 30 minutes, stirring the pan occasionally.

Melt the butter in a shallow pan, then add the reserved sliced onions and let them cook slowly, with the occasional stir, until they are a rich toffee brown. This will take a good half an hour.

Add the linguine or noodles to the simmering beans. Wash the spinach, put it in a separate pan set over a medium heat, cover with a lid and leave it for 3 or 4 minutes until it has wilted. Turn occasionally with kitchen tongs. Remove the spinach and put it in a colander under cold running water until cool.

Wring the moisture from the spinach with your hands then stir into the simmering stew. Roughly chop the parsley, coriander and mint leaves and stir most of them into the onions and beans.

Fold in the soured cream, then ladle into bowls and fold in the remaining herbs and the fried onions.

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Chick Pea Pastini

August 10, 2017

Lamb Tagine (Mary Berry)

September 20, 2016

lamb-tagine-mary-berry

Pepper and Pesto Pasta Salad

June 14, 2016

Pepper and Pesto Pasta Salad 1Pepper and Pesto Pasta Salad 2

Spiced Vegetable Tagine

November 18, 2015

Spiced Vegetable Tagine

Chestnut Chickpea and Chorizo Soup

November 5, 2015

Chestnut Chickpea and Chorizo Soup

Speedy Chorizo and Chickpea Stew (Rachel Khoo)

October 14, 2015

Speedy Chorizo and Chickpea Stew (Rachel Khoo)

Lamb and Chickpea Rice with Tamarind Swirl Yogurt

August 13, 2015

lamb and chickpea rice with tamarind swirl yogurt

Pot-roasted pollock, chickpeas and chorizo (Tom Kerridge)

February 26, 2014

Serves 4–6
dried chickpeas 150g
sea salt flakes 4 tbsp
saffron pinch
pollock, 1 fillet (about 500g), skinned and pin bones removed
olive oil 100ml
garlic 2 cloves, grated
fresh red chillies 2, chopped; seeds and all
onions 2, finely chopped
cooking chorizos 4, cut into bite-size chunks
dried bay leaves 2
cinnamon stick 1
ground cumin 1 tsp
smoked paprika 1 tsp
chopped tomatoes 400g can
chicken stock 200ml
spinach leaves 400g
salt and pepper to taste

A day ahead, place the chickpeas in a large bowl with water to cover and leave to soak overnight.

The next day, drain the chickpeas and place them in a saucepan with fresh water to cover. Bring to the boil, skimming the surface as necessary. Reduce the heat to very low and leave them to simmer, uncovered, for 2 hours, or until the chickpeas are tender. Remove the pan from the heat and leave the chickpeas to cool in the water in the uncovered pan. They will expand in size.

Meanwhile, mix together the sea salt flakes and saffron. Place of piece of clingfilm large enough to wrap around the pollock on the work surface.

Sprinkle half the salt mix on to the clingfilm and place the pollock on top, then sprinkle the remaining salt mix over the fish and wrap in the clingfilm tightly. Place this parcel into the fridge for 1½ hours.

Heat the olive oil in a large flameproof casserole over a medium heat. Add garlic, red chillies and onions and fry, stirring occasionally, for 6-8 minutes until the onion has softened.

Add the chorizo to the pot and continue frying for a further 5 minutes so the red paprika-soaked oil comes out from the sausage. Stir in the bay leaves, cinnamon stick, cumin and paprika and fry, stirring, for a further 3-4 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 170C/gas mark 3. Drain the chickpeas and add them to the pot, then add the canned tomatoes and pour in the stock. Bring to the boil and put it in the oven for 45 minutes.

Remove the pan from the oven and taste the chickpeas. The sauce should have reduced a little and thickened. Add salt, if necessary.

Rinse the pollock thoroughly in running cold water.

Pat it dry and place on top of the chickpeas. Place the pot back into the oven for a further 15 minutes, or until the fish is cooked through and the flesh flakes easily.

Remove the pot from the oven. Gently take the fish from the pot and place it onto a large serving plate.

Stir the spinach into the hot chickpeas until it just wilts. Spoon this mix over and around the fish and serve immediately. Remember to take out the bay leaves and the cinnamon.

Slow-cooked chickpeas on toast with poached egg (Yotam Ottolenghi)

October 23, 2013

“I tested this dish on a group of card-carrying sceptics: “Five hours to cook beans on toast?” How could I possibly justify the time involved when the more famous variation on this theme can be on the table inside a couple of minutes? Each to their own, I say. These chickpeas are impossibly soft and yielding, and the flavour is rich and deep in a way that only slow cooking can bring about. (Please don’t be tempted to omit the salt: it keeps the skins intact and prevents the chickpeas from disintegrating.)

Notwithstanding the cooking time, this is really very low-maintenance comfort food. The chickpeas taste fantastic the next day, too, not to mention the day after that, so you might want to double the quantities and keep a batch in the fridge. I like it topped with a spoonful of Greek yogurt.”

Serves four.

220g medium-sized dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in lots of cold water with ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tbsp olive oil, plus 1 tbsp to serve
1 medium onion, peeled and roughly chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1½ tsp tomato paste
¼ tsp cayenne pepper
¼ tsp smoked paprika
2 small red peppers, roughly chopped into 0.5cm dice
Salt and black pepper
1 beef tomato, peeled and roughly chopped
½ tsp caster sugar

To serve
4 slices sourdough, brushed with olive oil and grilled on both sides
4 eggs, poached
1 tsp za’atar

Strain and rinse the chickpeas. Put a large saucepan on a high heat, add the chickpeas and cover with plenty of cold water. Bring to a boil, skim the surface, boil for five minutes, strain and set the chickpeas aside.

Put the oil, onion, garlic, tomato paste, cayenne, paprika and red peppers in a food processor, along with a teaspoon of salt and some black pepper, and blitz to a paste.

Wipe down the chickpea saucepan, return it to the stove on medium heat and add the paste. Fry for five minutes (there’s enough oil in the paste to allow for this), stirring occasionally, then add the tomato, sugar, chickpeas and 200ml water. Bring to a low simmer, cover and cook on a very low heat for four hours, stirring from time to time and adding water as needed to maintain a sauce-like consistency. Remove the lid and cook for a final hour: the sauce needs to thicken without the chickpeas becoming dry.

Put a slice of grilled sourdough on each plate, spoon over some chickpeas and top with a poached egg. Sprinkle over some za’atar and a dribble of oil, and serve hot.