Archive for January, 2016

Maple Pannacotta with buttered rum figs

January 28, 2016

Maple Pannacotta with buttered rum figs

British Pancakes (Felicity Cloake)

January 12, 2016

Makes about 8

125g plain flour
Pinch of salt
1 egg plus 1 egg yolk
225ml whole or semi-skimmed milk
Small knob of butter

1. Sift the flour in a large mixing bowl and add a pinch of salt. Make a well in the centre, and pour the egg and the yolk into it. Mix the milk with 2 tbsp water and then pour a little in with the egg and beat together.

2. Whisk the flour into the liquid ingredients, drawing it gradually into the middle until you have a smooth paste the consistency of double cream. Whisk the rest of the milk in until the batter is more like single cream. Cover and refrigerate for at least half an hour.
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3. Heat the butter in a frying pan on a medium-high heat – you only need enough fat to just grease the bottom of the pan. It should be hot enough that the batter sizzles when it hits it.

4. Spread a small ladleful of batter across the bottom of the pan, quickly swirling to coat. Tip any excess away. When it begins to set, loosen the edges with a thin spatula or palette knife, and when it begins to colour on the bottom, flip it over with the same instrument and cook for another 30 seconds. (If you’re feeling cocky, you can also toss the pancake after loosening it: grasp the handle firmly with both hands, then jerk the pan up and slightly towards you.)

5. Pancakes are best eaten as soon as possible, before they go rubbery, but if you’re cooking for a crowd, keep them separate until you’re ready to serve by layering them up between pieces of kitchen roll.

Why don’t we eat more pancakes in this country – and which recipes are good enough to change our minds? What are your favourite toppings, and do you have any top tips for foolproof flippi

Mulligatawny Soup (Adam Liaw)

January 12, 2016

1 tbsp each butter and olive oil

1 large onion, finely diced

3 cloves garlic

1½ tbsp curry powder

1 tsp garam masala

2 tsp salt

1 can diced tomatoes (400g)

1.5L chicken stock

½ cup washed uncooked brown rice, or jasmine rice

1 Granny smith apple, peeled and finely diced

1 carrot, peeled and finely diced

1 small sweet potato, peeled and finely diced

2 cups cooked shredded chicken (optional)

coriander and yoghurt, to serve

 

Method

  1. Heat a large pot over high heat and fry the onion and garlic in the butter and olive oil. Add the curry powder, garam masala, salt and tomatoes and fry for a minute until the spices are fragrant.
  2. Add the chicken stock and the brown rice and simmer covered for one and a half hours, stirring occasionally. Add the apple, carrot and sweet potato and simmer for a further 30 minutes. Adjust for seasoning with a little salt if necessary.
  3. Stir through the Shredded chicken and a little yoghurt, and scatter with chopped coriander to serve.

Spaghettini Aglio E Olio (Nigel Slater)

January 12, 2016

Cook 200g spaghetti or the finer spaghettini in deep, salted boiling water until al dente. Drain lightly. Put a fat pinch of crushed, dried chillies, 2 cloves of garlic chopped very finely, 3 tbsp of freshly chopped flat-leaf parsley and 4 tbsp olive oil into a pan. Place over a low heat and cook until the garlic is pale gold. Toss the drained pasta with the warm oil and serve immediately.

The trick

The quality of the oil is important. Go for your favourite. Heating the garlic and chilli too much will send it bitter. To keep it sweet, make sure it doesn’t get any darker than palest gold. Keep parsley quite coarse to give the correct rustic quality to the dish. Drain the pasta only lightly, so that there is a little water left on it – this will help to ensure the pasta is moist and juicy. Salt the pasta water generously – it should taste like seawater.

The twist

I like the simplicity of this recipe as it is, but you can use it as a base for a more elaborate version by adding sliced, marinated artichokes, chopped olives, sun-dried tomatoes, chopped anchovies, toasted breadcrumbs, lemon zest, shavings of parmesan or shredded basil leaves.